University with Industry partnership & Green Campus

 

Partnering with leading healthcare providers

According to Maureen Mack, the college media-relations director, this technology-centered program costs $11 million to implement when all expenses are taken into consideration. In order to avoid spending additional money on a brand-new campus, yet still having the ability to provide a larger student population with adequate training and clinic space, the Medical College of Wisconsin is partnering with several health care providers and academic institutions. Bellin Health, Prevea Health, Bellin College,

St. Norbert College and the University of Wisconsin – Green Bay are the establishments participating in this new program model. The innovative collaboration of the medical campus with partnering facilities is looked upon favorably by a number of health care leaders throughout Wisconsin, including Therese Pandl, the CEO/President of Hospital Sisters Health System. Pandl opines that an increase in qualified medical students can greatly benefit the quality of care that Wisconsin patients receive.

 

How insiders view new campus

Matthew Hunsaker, the dean of the Medical College of Wisconsin’s Green Bay campus, believes that the college’s new technology-oriented program is a cost- effective and efficient way to solve the physician shortage program. He states that the curriculum is structured in a manner that allows students to hone their clinical skills early on so that they can work successfully as physicians after completing the program. Aspiring medical student, Julia Furtado, agrees with Hunsaker in regard to the importance of familiarizing future physicians with up-to-date technology. She feels that integrating technology at the classroom level prepares medical students for working with the electronic records systems used in modern professional environments. In contrast, Kyle Jackson, another pre-med student, thinks that increasing enrollment rates at medical schools may be a more effective way of preventing physician shortage in Wisconsin and other states.